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The Daily Brief: UK Tribunal Finds China Committed Genocide Against Uyghyr Muslims

An unofficial tribunal in the UK has claimed China responsible for various crimes against humanity towards Uyghur populations amounting to genocide

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  • An unofficial UK-based tribunal has ruled that China committed genocide against Uyghur Muslims in Xinjang. 
  • A panel held by lawyers and academics concluded that China took “deliberate” steps in fostering the “long-term reduction of Uyghur and other ethnic minority populations”. 
  • There was no outright “evidence of mass killings,” but other substantial evidence into crimes against humanity, such as torture and rape, according to head chair Sir Geoffry Nice. 
  • “The tribunal is satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the People’s Republic of China, by the imposition of measures to prevent births intended to destroy a significant part of the Uyghurs in Xinjiang as such, has committed genocide,” Nice also stated. 
  • Despite not having any legal action, the panel hopes the findings and conclusions are groundbreaking enough for countries to begin holding China responsible. 
  • The United States is one of the few countries who have recognized the genocide in China, also boycotting the 2022 Beijing Olympics alongside Canada, Australia, and The United Kingdom. 
  • However, the UK have yet to officially rule China’s acts against Uyghyr Muslims a genocide. The tribunal has urged for the government to apply sanctions with the findings, which remain ongoing.  
  • China has repeatedly denied these claims, but have refused independent investigations monitors into Xinjiang. 

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Food Aid Halted in Two Ethiopian Towns After Warehouse Looted

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  • The United Nations World Food Programme has halted food aid in Kombolcha and Dessie after supplies were looted. 
  • Staff working reported that they were unable to stop attempts, at some points being held at gunpoint. Items taken included humanitarian food supplies and nutritional items. 
  • “The small-scale theft of food escalated into mass looting of warehouses across Kombolcha in recent days, reportedly by elements of the Tigrayan forces and some members of the local population,” UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric stated, also adding the harassment of staff was “unacceptable”. 
  • The events will aggravate malnutrition and aid towards the ongoing food insecurity faced by northern regions in Ethiopia. 

The Biden Administration Considers Tightening Sanctions on Iran

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  • The Biden administration is planning to authorize sanctions against Iran, as prospects of restoring the 2015 nuclear deal appear out of question. Negotiations to revive the agreement continue in Vienna on Thursday, even though Iran refuses to negotiate directly with the US. 
  • The US will send a top-level delegation, including Andrea Gacki, next week to United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.), since the U.A.E. is one of US’s largest allies and one of  Iran’s largest trade partners and a channel for Iran’s trade and financial transactions with other countries.  
  • The US plans to meet with several U.A.E. private firms and banks that trade with Iran and warn them that if they’re not compliant with the sanctions put in place against Iran, they will face extreme risk. 
  • Furthermore, if there is no progress in nuclear talks, the US delegation will start visiting other countries, including Malaysia, Turkey, and Iran’s leading trade partner, China, in order to diplomatically put pressure on them and prevent partnering with Iran.

WHO Expresses Concern Over Vaccine Hoarding By Wealthy Nations

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  • Due to the UN-backed COVAX program, low-income countries are finally beginning to receive more donations of vaccine supply from high-income nations, but the World Health Organization (WHO) is concerned that the emergence of the omicron variant could result in the wealthier countries to start hoarding the Covid-19 vaccines.
  • The WHO Director shed light on the global distribution disparity of COVID-19 boosters and first shots to people in developing nations, noting that, globally, 6 times more booster doses are being administered than first-doses in developing nations.
  • And now, as the world waits to hear whether the current vaccines and boosters protect against the new omicron variant, there is once again fear that the high-income will hold on to their vaccine supply in order to prioritize vaccinating their own population. 
  • Yet, Kate O’Brien, head of WHO’s department of immunization, vaccines, and biologicals, states that this approach will not work, because unless a;ll the countries have access to the vaccine, only then will transmission of COVID-19 will decrease, because that’s where the variants are stemming from.

New Zealand Proposes Legislation to Ban Cigarettes for Younger Population

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  • New Zealand plans to propose legislation that will eventually ban the sale of tobacco to the next generation;  Their goal is to eventually phase out smoking in young people, so anyone born after 2008 will not be able to buy cigarettes or tobacco products in their lifetime.
  • Currently, 13.4% of New Zealand’s adult population are considered smokers, and this percentage is even higher in the indigenous Maori population, where 32% of Maori women smoke and 25% of men. 
  • The government plans to put a bill before Parliament in 2022 in order to reduce the prevalence of smoking nationally to 5% by 2025. The government will also propose laws that will help smokers quit, such as ensuring only products with low nicotine levels are manufactured and tougher restrictions on tobacco products.
  • Though, none of this legislation includes the practice of vaping, which has become far more popular in the younger generations than cigarettes. 20% of students vape and 57% of them feel that vaping has detrimental effects on their health. New Zealand authorities warn that vaping is not harmless and researchers have found carcinogenic agents in e-cigarettes as well.

Italy’s Antitrust Regulators Fine Amazon 1.13 Billion Euros

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  • Italy fined Amazon 1.13 billion euros ($1.28 billion) on Thursday for alleged abuse of market dominance, making it one of the biggest penalties against a U.S. Tech company in Europe. However, Amazon states that it strongly disagrees with the Italian antitrust regulators and it plans to appeal. 
  • It was reported that Amazon, while utilizing its dominant position in Italy’s e-commerce, encouraged other sellers on Amazon.it to adopt its own logistics service Fulfillment by Amazon (FBA). Amazon linked a seller’s FBA access to other exclusive benefits such as using the Prime label, which, in turn, increased Amazon’s visibility in the market and boosted their sales.
  • Global regularity scrutiny has been escalating after a string of scandals and complaints  over privacy and misinformation involving smaller businesses, and, in consequence, other US tech giants, such as Apple, Google, Facebook, and Microsoft are also under heightened scrutiny in Europe. 
  • This is the third investigation into Amazon’s business practices opened in Europe , with the EU Commision already having two of its own ongoing investigations opened in 2019 and 2020. 

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

Daily Brief

China Threatens Consequences if Pelosi Visits Taiwan

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  • US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi has landed inTaiwan. Prior to the visit, China’s Foreign Ministry has voiced their disapproval, stating that “China will take resolute responses and strong countermeasures to defend its sovereignty and territorial integrity.”
  • US Secretary of State Antony Blinken emphasized in response  that “The speaker will make her own decisions about whether or not to visit Taiwan,” and that the US is looking to Beijing to “act responsibly and not to engage in any escalation going forward.”
  • The US has made it clear that members of Congress routinely visit Taiwan and that this trip is non-threatening and has precedent. Even so, some officials have expressed concern that China may invade Taiwan’s air defense zone or send missiles near Taiwan in retaliation.
  • Pelosi has criticized China’s leadership and vocalized support for Taiwan in the past. She is currently on her tour of Asia, with scheduled visits to Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea and Japan.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Daily Brief

First Grain Ship Departs Ukraine After Six Months of Russian Blockade

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  • The first shipment of grain departed the port of Odesa on Monday after Russia’s blockade of Ukrainian ports for the last six months trapped around 20 million metric tons of wheat and corn.
  • Russia recently made a deal with Ukraine, brokered by the UN and Turkey, allowing grain exports to resume, appeasing fears of a global food supply crisis and rising prices.
  • Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba celebrated the shipment, calling it a “day of relief for the world, especially for our friends in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa.”
  • Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky was more hesitant to celebrate the shipment, stating “it is too early to draw any conclusions and make any forecasts” and he wants to “see how the agreement works and whether security will be really guaranteed.”

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Daily Brief

Concerns Rise As US Teeters on the Brink of Recession

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  • The US economy declines for the second quarter in a row, causing, what other countries would consider, an economic recession. 
  • The prices for groceries, gas, and other basics are rising at the fastest pace since 1981. The US Central Bank is quickly trying to raise borrowing costs in order to cool the economy and ease the prices on goods, but with the contraction, at the annual rate of 0.9% in the 3 months to July, many are still getting concerned. 
  • President Biden struggles to convince the public that the economy is sound, with the unemployment rate at a low 3.6%. But with inflation in the US hitting 9.1% in June, the fastest price appreciation in 4 months, consumer spending has slowed at an annual rate of 1%. 
  • Many other countries, such as China and the UK, have been hit harder by the surge in energy prices and the War in Ukraine, causing risks from abroad. Other countries are facing much more serious problems and once they’re hit, their problems can spill over and affect the US. 

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Daily Brief

North Korea Could Possibly Be Preparing another Nuclear Test

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  • North Korea could be preparing a seventh nuclear test, especially after Mr. Kim announced that the country is fully ready for any military confrontation with the US at a Korean War Anniversary event. 
  • A US special representative in North Korea states that Jong-Un has tested an unprecedented number of missiles this year—31 to 25. Jong-Un also stated that threats from the US required North Korea to achieve the urgent historical task of strengthening its self-defense. 
  • Jong-un also stated that South Korea is reviving a plan to counter North Korea’s threat by mounting precautionary strikes; in June alone, South Korea launched 8 missiles of its own.
  • The North Korean regime is especially angry with South Korea’s new president Yoon Suk-yeol and his so-called Kill Chain strategy. This strategy allows South Korea to launch ballistic missiles and air strikes on North Korean targets if it ever feels threatened. 
  • North Korea has also not been getting as much engagement with Washington ever since Biden replaced Trump, and could be hinting at some sort of deliberate escalation by the North, and preparations have been underway at the Punggye Ri test site since March.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Daily Brief

Russia Limits Gas Supply to Germany

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  • Gazprom, a major Russian energy provider, has stated it will reduce the supply of gas to Germany by half via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline due to repair work. 
  • Germany has said that they see no technical reason for the decrease in gas supply. The European Union continues to accuse Russia of weaponizing energy, with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky stating, “This is an open gas war that Russia is waging against a united Europe.”
  • Ukraine and Russia signed an agreement to allow the export of grain via the Black Sea after Russia continued to block millions of tonnes from being exported. The next day, Russia struck missiles at the port, some of which hit the infrastructure of the port.
  • The US and Ukraine are optimistic that the agreement will still be implemented, with the US State Department stating, “Despite these attacks, we do understand that the parties are continuing preparations to open Ukraine’s Black Sea ports for food and fertilizer exports…we also continue to expect that the Black Sea agreement will be implemented.”

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Daily Brief

Pope Francis Apologizes for Indigenous Abuse in Canadian Residential Schools

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  • Pope Francis traveled to the grounds of a former residential school near Alberta, Canada and formally apologized for the Church’s role in the abuse of indigenous people and erasure of indigenous culture.
  • The majority of the schools were run by members of the Roman Catholic Church in the late 1800s and 1900s. Around 150,000 indigenous children were sent to the schools and more than 3,000 are estimated to have died.
  • In his speech, the Pope asked for forgiveness and highlighted the Church’s role in the schools system, stating, “I ask forgiveness, in particular, for the ways in which many members of the Church and of religious communities cooperated… in projects of cultural destruction and forced assimilation promoted by the governments of that time, which culminated in the system of residential schools.”
  • Indigenous chiefs, survivors of the residential schools, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau were some of the few in attendance for the Pope’s remarks.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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