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The Daily Brief: France’s Macron Acknowledges French ‘Responsibility’ In Rwandan Genocide

France’s Macron Acknowledges French ‘Responsibility’ In Rwandan Genocide

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Kremlin.ru, CC BY 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Summary:

  • France’s President Emmanuel Macron spoke at the Kigali Genocide Memorial in Rwanda where he announced that France recognized its “responsibility” in the Rwandan genocide.
  • Macron also requested forgiveness for France’s role in the genocide stating he has come to Rwanda “to recognise the extent of [France’s] responsibilities in the slaughter”.
  • The Rwandan Genocide began in April 1994 and resulted in the deaths of 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and moderate Hutus at the hands of Hutu militias.
  • The genocide ended in July 1994 with the rise of current President Paul Kagame of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF).
  • Macron stopped short of issuing a formal apology and made sure to clarify that France “was not an accomplice” to the genocide.
  • President Macron’s visit comes after a report released in March by a French inquiry panel deduced that the French government bore a “serious and overwhelming” responsibility in the slaughter due to their dismissal of warnings regarding the genocide and their “de facto” support of the genocidial Rwandan government. 
  • Rwandan President Paul Kagame praised the March report claiming that it opened the door to normalizing relations between Rwanda and France.
  • Kagame stated that Macron’s “words were more powerful than an apology”.
  • Macron’s visit to Rwanda is the first visit by a French leader to the country in over a decade. 
  • Over 250,000 victims of the Rwandan genocide are buried at the Kigali Genocide Memorial where Macron delivered his speech.
  • Sources:

Reuters

Al Jazeera

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Thousands Flee Goma Following Threat of Another Volcanic Eruption

Lava Lake Nyiragongo 2
Cai Tjeenk Willink (Caitjeenk), CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons
  • After officials announced the threat of another volcanic eruption from Mount Nyiragongo, tens of thousands of people are fleeing the Congolese city of Goma, filling the streets with car and pedestrian traffic.
  • Mount Nyiragongo erupted after nineteen years on Saturday, leaving many unprepared for the lava that killed more than thirty people and destroyed hundreds of homes.
  • After the eruption on Saturday, there have been earthquakes, tremors and significant cracks in buildings and roads. Officials have said that there could be changes in the situation at any moment.
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Global Temperature Nearing Troubling Limit at Fast Speed

Industry smoke
Uwe Hermann, CC BY-SA 2.5 , via Wikimedia Commons
  • A report published by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) stated that there is a 40% chance of Earth being 1.5 degrees Celsius hotter than pre-industrial levels between 2021-2025.
  • Last year, the WMO put the chances of a 1.5 degrees Celsius temperature increase at 20%. The Paris Agreement set the goal of limiting the increase in global average temperature to less than or around 1.5 degrees Celsius over a long period of time.
  • A single year that hits this temperature limit does not mean that the Paris Agreement limits have failed, but it is troubling news in the long run. Many have called this new report a wake up call for limits to greenhouse gas emissions and global warming.
  • Scientists have reported that an average global temperature of above 1.5 degrees Celsius will result in long term, catastrophic effects of climate change. Some had hoped that climate change would improve with certain activities being decreased because of the global pandemic, but that does not seem to be the case.
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PM of Somalia Commits to Free and Fair Elections 

  • The Prime Minister of Somalia, Mohamed Hussein Roble has committed to free and fair elections following months of a political impasse leading to violence and crisis in the country.
  • An agreement deal was signed by regional presidents and Prime Minister Roble allowing indirect elections to take place – elections will be held in 60 days according to the agreement.
  • A constitutional crisis was spurred in February when President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed and state leaders had been unable to agree on the terms of a vote – violence erupted in April when the lower house of parliament extended the president’s mandate by two years.
  • In a ceremony, Prime Minister Roble affirmed the commitment of his government to a “free and fair indirect election” while also stating the responsibility to ensure women reach their quota of having 30% in government positions.
  • Tweets:

Public Vote in Hong Kong Reduced Amid New Electoral Law

  • Hong Kong’s legislature passed a bill Thursday that greatly reduced the public vote and increased the number of pro-Beijing lawmakers.
  • The number of seats in the legislator expanded to 90, with 40 of them being elected by a largely pro-Beijing election committee – the number of legislators directly affected by Hong Kong voters will be reduced to 20 from 35.
  • The United States called on the Chinese government and Hong Kong authorities to allow all Hong Kongers to be heard and to release those held for dissenting views.
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All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Salman Rushdie Severely Stabbed due to his Publication of the Book “The Satanic Verses”

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Salman Rushdie 2014
  • Salman Rushdie, an author, was severely stabbed in his neck and abdomen on stage by a suspect named Hadi Matar, causing him to be on a ventilator and potentially losing an eye.
  • An Iranian leader back in the 20th century wanted Rushdie killed because of his novel, Satanic Verses, that many Muslims found disrespectful. This led Salman to go into hiding for almost a decade.
  • Translators from different countries reading this book were harshly stabbed to death when the book came out and Iranian leader, Ayatollah Khomeini called for Salman’s execution for three million dollars.
  • The Iranian government has not yet responded to this issue, but many Iranians in the media claim him to be an apostate who later became an atheist.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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China Threatens Consequences if Pelosi Visits Taiwan

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  • US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi has landed inTaiwan. Prior to the visit, China’s Foreign Ministry has voiced their disapproval, stating that “China will take resolute responses and strong countermeasures to defend its sovereignty and territorial integrity.”
  • US Secretary of State Antony Blinken emphasized in response  that “The speaker will make her own decisions about whether or not to visit Taiwan,” and that the US is looking to Beijing to “act responsibly and not to engage in any escalation going forward.”
  • The US has made it clear that members of Congress routinely visit Taiwan and that this trip is non-threatening and has precedent. Even so, some officials have expressed concern that China may invade Taiwan’s air defense zone or send missiles near Taiwan in retaliation.
  • Pelosi has criticized China’s leadership and vocalized support for Taiwan in the past. She is currently on her tour of Asia, with scheduled visits to Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea and Japan.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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First Grain Ship Departs Ukraine After Six Months of Russian Blockade

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Odesa pristav
  • The first shipment of grain departed the port of Odesa on Monday after Russia’s blockade of Ukrainian ports for the last six months trapped around 20 million metric tons of wheat and corn.
  • Russia recently made a deal with Ukraine, brokered by the UN and Turkey, allowing grain exports to resume, appeasing fears of a global food supply crisis and rising prices.
  • Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba celebrated the shipment, calling it a “day of relief for the world, especially for our friends in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa.”
  • Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky was more hesitant to celebrate the shipment, stating “it is too early to draw any conclusions and make any forecasts” and he wants to “see how the agreement works and whether security will be really guaranteed.”

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Concerns Rise As US Teeters on the Brink of Recession

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  • The US economy declines for the second quarter in a row, causing, what other countries would consider, an economic recession. 
  • The prices for groceries, gas, and other basics are rising at the fastest pace since 1981. The US Central Bank is quickly trying to raise borrowing costs in order to cool the economy and ease the prices on goods, but with the contraction, at the annual rate of 0.9% in the 3 months to July, many are still getting concerned. 
  • President Biden struggles to convince the public that the economy is sound, with the unemployment rate at a low 3.6%. But with inflation in the US hitting 9.1% in June, the fastest price appreciation in 4 months, consumer spending has slowed at an annual rate of 1%. 
  • Many other countries, such as China and the UK, have been hit harder by the surge in energy prices and the War in Ukraine, causing risks from abroad. Other countries are facing much more serious problems and once they’re hit, their problems can spill over and affect the US. 

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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North Korea Could Possibly Be Preparing another Nuclear Test

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  • North Korea could be preparing a seventh nuclear test, especially after Mr. Kim announced that the country is fully ready for any military confrontation with the US at a Korean War Anniversary event. 
  • A US special representative in North Korea states that Jong-Un has tested an unprecedented number of missiles this year—31 to 25. Jong-Un also stated that threats from the US required North Korea to achieve the urgent historical task of strengthening its self-defense. 
  • Jong-un also stated that South Korea is reviving a plan to counter North Korea’s threat by mounting precautionary strikes; in June alone, South Korea launched 8 missiles of its own.
  • The North Korean regime is especially angry with South Korea’s new president Yoon Suk-yeol and his so-called Kill Chain strategy. This strategy allows South Korea to launch ballistic missiles and air strikes on North Korean targets if it ever feels threatened. 
  • North Korea has also not been getting as much engagement with Washington ever since Biden replaced Trump, and could be hinting at some sort of deliberate escalation by the North, and preparations have been underway at the Punggye Ri test site since March.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Russia Limits Gas Supply to Germany

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Black Sea port of Theodosiya panoramio
  • Gazprom, a major Russian energy provider, has stated it will reduce the supply of gas to Germany by half via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline due to repair work. 
  • Germany has said that they see no technical reason for the decrease in gas supply. The European Union continues to accuse Russia of weaponizing energy, with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky stating, “This is an open gas war that Russia is waging against a united Europe.”
  • Ukraine and Russia signed an agreement to allow the export of grain via the Black Sea after Russia continued to block millions of tonnes from being exported. The next day, Russia struck missiles at the port, some of which hit the infrastructure of the port.
  • The US and Ukraine are optimistic that the agreement will still be implemented, with the US State Department stating, “Despite these attacks, we do understand that the parties are continuing preparations to open Ukraine’s Black Sea ports for food and fertilizer exports…we also continue to expect that the Black Sea agreement will be implemented.”

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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