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The Daily Brief: Russia Snaps Back At US For ‘Killer’ Jab

Russian President Vladimir Putin angrily reacts to being called a ‘killer’ by US President Joe Biden

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Russia Snaps Back At US For ‘Killer Jab
World Economic ForumCopyright by World Economic ForumPhoto by Remy Steinegger, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Summary:

  • In an interview released by ABC on Wednesday, President Joe Biden responded “I do” to a question asking whether he thought Russia’s President Vladimir Putin is a killer.
  • President Biden also claimed that Putin will “pay the price” for alleged meddling in US elections.
  • Putin responded with a Russian school playground rhyme equating to the American phrase “it takes one to know one”.
  • Putin also challenged Biden to a live “open and direct discussion” online, asserting that “it would be interesting for both Russian people and for US people, as well as for many other countries”
  • The White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki has stated that President Biden has no regrets about his comment, asserting that “the President gave a direct answer to a direct question”.
  • The Russian government has erupted in fury following Biden’s comments declaring that his accusation was unprecedented and that the relationship between the two countries is “very bad”.
  • Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on Thursday that Biden’s accusation shows that he “definitely does not want to normalize relations” with Russia and that the Kremlin will be reacting “precisely on this premise”.
  • Russia has recalled their ambassador to the US to Moscow so they can “discuss ways to rectify Russia – U.S. ties that are in crisis.”
  • The last time Russia recalled their US ambassador was in 1998 in protest over the bombing of Iraq.

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Increasing US Support for Taiwan Prior to Meeting with China

  • The Biden Administration has approved an export of technologies to Taiwan for a new submarine fleet, a move that parallels the supportive stance the Trump Administration had with Taiwan.
  • Later this week, top US officials are meeting with top Beijing officials, who have repeatedly warned against US relations with Taiwan as China is preparing to take control of Taiwan by any means, including extreme force.
  • Beijing has increased military pressure in Taiwan, with an attack expected in the next few years and the US likely to defend Taiwan.

Gunmen Attack in Niger Kills 58 Civilians

  • 58 civilians in Niger were attacked by gunmen on motorcycles, who also attacked a nearby village, with no immediate claim of responsibility.
  • The border between Mali and Niger continues to have high tension, with armed groups present having ties to ISIS and Al-Qaeda.
  • Deadly attacks by militants have occurred recently, with 100 people being killed in a coordinated attack in January.

The Covid-19 Pandemic Continues to Worsen in Brazil 

  • The coronavirus outbreak is now worse than ever in Brazil, as the country reports nearly 3,000 deaths in one day.
  • Hospitals across South America’s most populous country are at capacity as variants of Covid-19 virus enter Brazil.
  • President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil is soon to appoint the fourth person to be Health Minister since the start of the pandemic, Marcelo Queiroga.
  • While Queiroga emphasized washing hands and wearing masks to the Brazilian public he did not endorse measures of social distancing or any form of lockdown. 

North Korea to Begin Weapons Testing After a Three-Year Hiatus 

  • The US assessed that North Korea is planning to begin their first weapons test since President Joe Biden of America took office after a three-year hiatus. 
  • North Korea has held tests near the beginning of new US and South Korean administrations for the past 12 years, one in 2017 after Donald Trump took office, and one in 2009 after Barack Obama took office. 
  • Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and Secretary of State Anthony Blinken are conducting their first overseas visit in Asia by first visiting Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga of Japan and later going to South Korea.
  • In response to these visits Kim Yo Jung, sister to North Korea leader Kim Jong Un, said “If they want to have a good night’s sleep for the next four years, it would be good for them not to do things that would prevent them from sleeping properly from the start.” 

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

Daily Brief

Russian Forces Finally Abandon Snake Island as a Gesture of Goodwill

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Battle of Snake Island 2022
  • Russian forces have officially abandoned Snake or Zmiinyi Island as a gesture of goodwill in order to prove that it was not obstructing grain exports. But this claim was instantly dismissed by Ukraine once Moscow continued to shell its grain stores. 
  • Snake Island was seized by Russians on February 24; the island, which is just 22 miles away from Ukraine, is exposed to attacks from all directions, including air and sea. Once Russia seized it, Ukraine attacked the island itself and any vessels carrying troops or heavy weaponry. 
  • Ukrainian military analyst Oleh Zhdanov states that controlling this island and stationing troops doesn’t make sense for either side and the island is an easy target. He argued that maintaining “fire control,”.which is having the capability to strike any target approaching the island, is a better advantage for either side. 
  • The key question is whether the Ukrainians will consider  exporting grain to reboot the war economy. However, the Russian warships still gain dominance over the Black Sea, and although they are offering Ukraine to export grains from Odessa, Ukraine rejected it due to it having to remove mines from outside the port. 

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Justice Ketanji Brown Officially Gets Sworn into the Supreme Court

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  • Ketanji Brown was officially sworn into the nation’s highest court, finally replacing former Justice Stephen Breyer. This was just in time, when decisions on environment and immigration cases are in the midst of being determined. 
  • Right when the Biden administration was trying to slash emissions and scientists have been growing alarmingly concerned about the accelerating pace of global warming, the Supreme Court curbed the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to regulate carbon emissions from power plants. The court also cut back on agency authority which will limit the federal government’s power to regulate climate policy, along with internet and worker safety. 
  • Nevertheless, the Biden administration finally achieved one victory on its agenda when the Supreme Court gave Biden the authority to end the “Remain in Mexico” policy, that originated under the Trump administration. According to Justice John Roberts, the immigration statute confers a discretionary authority to return aliens to Mexico during the pendency of their immigration proceedings. 
  • 3 abortion-related cases were also sent back down to lower courts by the Supreme Court, now that Roe v. Wade has been overturned. 
  • Even though the next term doesn’t start until three months later, there are many momentous cases that Jackson will take part in along with the other justices. On the first day of the term, they will hear a case that could limit the federal government’s jurisdiction over wetlands. The following day, they plan to hear a redistributing case in Alabama and North Carolina, which could drastically change voting rights across the country. 

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Daily Brief

Cancelling Canada Day: A Country Perpetuating Injustice Cannot be Celebrated

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Canada Day is celebrated every July 1st, but as the injustices against Indigenous people in the country become mainstream, calls to cancel the celebrations are amplified.

With fireworks and large festivals, Canada Day is celebrated from coast to coast on July 1st by millions of people, every year. The day, for many Canadians, is one of joy and gratitude, for the home that Canada has become for them. 

However, following the discovery of mass graves at the site of former Residential Schools, celebrating Canada Day is becoming confusing for many. 

Residential schools, among other historical policies, made essentially to assimilate Indigenous peoples and erase their culture, are one of the causes of deeply rooted intergenerational trauma and disproportionate access to resources in Indigenous communities.

Canada Day, which marks the day of confederation and the day that Canada became its own nation also marks the day that the oppression of Indigenous peoples was taken into Canada’s own hands. Calls to ‘cancel Canada Day’ become louder each year, as the injustices which were perpetuated to help bring the country to where it is today become more widely known.

Canada, the “true, north, strong and free”, as described in the country’s national anthem, was established at the price of the lives, autonomy and rights of hundreds of thousands of Indigenous peoples.

Canada recognizes its Indigenous population broadly as the FNMI — which stands for the First Nations, the Métis and the Inuit. All three Indigenous nations were directly impacted during colonization, through forced relocations, harmful policies, and cultural genocides.

The Indian Act following confederation was a legal document which specifically prevented the First Nations people in Canada from many things, including cultural practices, political actions and restricted their freedom. Under this act, First Nations could not leave reserves that the government forced them onto, without explicit permission from an Indian Agent first. The RCMP – the Royal Canadian Mounted Police known today as Canada’s FBI – was made with the intention to force and keep Indigenous peoples on their reserves.

First Nations and Métis were also predominantly affected by residential schools and the sixties scoop, when Indigenous children were taken from their homes and given up for adoption. Both of these efforts were made with the goal of assimilating Indigenous children, by “killing the Indian in the child“.

The Inuit faced dehumanization with their forced relocation into the High Arctic, a land they were not traditionally accustomed to. They were used as human flagpoles in the race to claim the Arctic, giving Canada a land advantage over countries like Russia and the United States.

For the sake of Canada’s growth as a Western nation, Indigenous peoples were used as pawns. First Nations and Métis were forced onto reserves to make space for European settlers, while the government commissioned a mass Inuit dog slaughter, to keep the Inuit stranded in the High Arctic, so that Canada could not lose their claim over that land.

The birth of a nation had become more important than the lives of Indigenous peoples who have existed since time immemorial. And because of that, Canada was born with blood on its hands — blood it has yet to wash off in full, as the country’s growth continues to be more important than respecting Indigenous peoples who’ve lived there for centuries.

The Canadian government has a long-standing history of making promises to the Indigenous community and then turning their back on them — whether that means refusing to turn their words into action or taking action that has the opposite impact.

Indigenous peoples in Canada have been long subject to unjust conditions: many communities lack access to clean water. The government has acknowledged this; however, it hasn’t done much beyond that to actually improve living standards on reserves. Indigenous peoples are subject to disproportionate rates of police brutality and violence, especially in the North. Despite multiple reports recording the numbers, institutions are not doing much to change their practices.

Most prominently, the pipeline debate has shown how the government is willing to backtrack on their promises to Indigenous peoples to protect their rights, if it results in a growth for the country. Although Justin Trudeau ran a campaign in 2016 heavily opposing the Coastal GasLink and Trans Mountain pipelines, in 2019 his government bought the pipelines to take over the project and continue it, despite protests from Indigenous peoples pleading otherwise.

Time and time again, Indigenous communities in Canada seem to be living in an entirely different country; the “true, north, strong and free,” seems more like a betraying, oppressive and unjust nation. Their rights are considered dispensable in favour of material growth, and in society, they face stereotypes that lessen their quality of life.

The question: to celebrate or to not celebrate, might seem like a hard one when Canada Day is meant to be a day where Canadians rejoice for all that the country is to them. But the answer is quite straightforward, when it is the suffering of people caused by Canada in question.

For many — those born in Canada, those who immigrated here, and those seeking refuge here — there is much to be grateful for, on Canada Day. But showing gratitude for living in a country such as Canada and acknowledging the injustices it participates in are not mutually exclusive attitudes.

Sol Mamakwa, an Indigenous MPP for Kiiwetinoong, an electoral riding in Ontario, stated in a message for Canada Day, “It is my hope that Canadians will be able to strike a balance between honouring all that Canada has done for them today while still recognizing the real history of oppression, colonialism and genocide.”

Even if most Canadians do not experience the struggles of Indigenous peoples firsthand, these struggles still affect the very fabric of Canada. The country is only as great as it treats its Indigenous peoples, whose losses the country was built upon. And every single Canadian plays a role in advocating for the better treatment of Indigenous peoples.

To celebrate Canada Day, we must want better for the people who have lost everything for it, but we also must mourn with them for all the loss they have had to face. 

Canada Day should become a holiday more meaningful than fireworks and festivals: it needs to become a day of reflection. We must cancel Canada Day’s insensitive celebrations, by understanding the context of it, because injustice simply isn’t something you can celebrate.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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I am a student from Ontario, Canada, and an aspiring journalist. I enjoy reading, writing and learning about the world around us - the issues with it and how we can make it a better place.

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Daily Brief

Trump Knew His Supporters Were Armed in Jan. 6 Capitol Riots

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  • Former White House aid, Cassidy Hutchinson, stated that former US President Donald Trump was aware that rioters were armed on January 6th, 2021 when they stormed the US Capitol, but he did not want to stop them.
  • Hutchinson worked as a top advisor to Mr Trump’s chief of staff, and testified at a hearing to a select House committee that was in charge of investigating the Jan 6th riot at the US Capitol.
  • Hutchinson recounted how Mr. Trump said that rioters were “not here to hurt me” and that security should “let them in.” She also stated that he lunged at the driver of the limousine in a rage when he was told he could not be taken to the Capitol.
  • Mr Trump denied several parts of Hutchinson’s testimony, stating, “I didn’t want or request that we make room for people with guns to watch my speech.”

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Fire During Colombia Prison Riot Kills 51

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  • A fire broke out in a Colombian prison during a riot, killing 51 inmates and injuring dozens. The fire was started by an inmate setting a mattress ablaze during the commotion and the flames spreading.
  • Colombian President Ivan Duque requested a “quick investigation to explain this terrible situation” and expressed his solidarity “to the families of the victims.”
  • No prisoners seem to have escaped and the fire is now under control. Twenty four people are currently in the hospital.
  • Prisons in Colombia are extremely overcrowded, as it was in this case, making riots and fighting amongst inmates a common occurrence.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Daily Brief

50 Migrants Found Dead Near the US-Mexico Border

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U.S
  • Fifty migrants were found dead near the US-Mexico border in an abandoned semi truck due to “poverty and desperation,” according to Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador.
  • The vehicle in which the victims were found was lacking air conditioning and water and, coupled with the extremely hot climate, it is suspected that they likely died from dehydration and heat stroke.
  • Migrants from Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala were among the victims. Sixteen people survived the incident and were taken to the hospital.
  • US President Joe Biden spoke about the incident, stating that his administration “will continue to do everything possible to stop human smugglers and traffickers from taking advantage of people who are seeking to enter the United States between ports of entry.”

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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