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The Daily Brief: Prince Philip dies at age 99

World mourns Duke of Edinburgh, longest serving spouse in the history of the monarchy

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Summary:

  • Prince Philip, husband of Queen Elizabeth II, died yesterday at age 99 at Windsor Place in England.
  • The Duke of Edinburgh was married to the Queen for nearly 74 years.
  • Nephew to WWII Naval War Officer Lord Mountbatten, Prince Philip fought in WWII.
  • Leaders from around the world have issued words of condolence for Her Majesty’s loss, including British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, U.S. President Joe Biden and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
  • Prince Philip was born in Greece and sixth in line to the Greek throne.
  • The flag at Buckingham Palace was at half mast to honor Prince Philip.
  • Prince Philip leaves a legacy of four children, eight grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.

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Boeing Co. Grounds Over 730 Flights

  • The Aerospace company Boeing grounded over 730 flights this Thursday due to an electrical flaw, forcing the cancellation of flights across 16 different airlines.  
  • The United States Federal Aviation Administration released a statement about how this “could affect the operation of a backup power control unit,” ensuring that “the issue is addressed” amongst different airlines and manufacturers. 
  • Boeing hasn’t released a statement or a definite time before all repairs are made. American operations chief David Seymour stated that they “traced the issue to a production change made in the installation process that occurred after our last aircraft was delivered before the fleet grounding in March 2019, which means 24 of our 737 Max aircraft are not affected by this issue.”
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Ingenuity: The First Flight on Mars

  • The Mars helicopter named Ingenuity, which landed with fellow Rover Perseverance on February 18th, prepares to make history as the first guided flight on another planet. 
  • Takeoff is projected to occur just after April 11th and to last 90 seconds at 10 feet over the Red Planet, with support from the helicopters longer blades “from tip to tip and wider across” in comparison to a helicopter flown on Earth, according to Ben Pipenberg, an engineer at AeroVironment. 
  • Ingenuity is equipped with an array of defenses against anything preventing it’s flight, and even a camera to take photos. This flight will hopefully be the start of many to come, and eventually provide data for aircrafts to set foot on Mars in the future. 
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Attacks In Mozambique Leave 12 People Beheaded

  • The Palma conflict in Mozambique has displaced more than 700,000 people during the last month.
  • Al-Shabab, an armed group rooted in the Cabo Delgado province, has increased the number and sophistication of their attacks.
  • More than 2,500 lives have been lost as young women and children have been abducted and civilians have been beheaded.
  • In the most recent attack 12 people were found beheaded and were suspected to be of white nationality.
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Amazon Warehouse In Bessemer, Alabama Leans Towards Not Unionizing

  • The fight to unionize an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama nears its end as a majority of votes oppose the unionizing.
  • The National Labor Relations Board reported 1,798 votes opposing the move, while 738 votes were cast with hopes of Bessemer becoming home to the first unionized Amazon facility in the United States.
  • Joshua Freeman, professor emeritus of labour history at Queens College at the City University of New York, said “Most unions don’t go to a union election unless they have a pretty big basis to think they’re in the ballpark. And either a lot of minds were changed, or the union misunderstood the situation when they filed for an election.”
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All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Salman Rushdie Severely Stabbed due to his Publication of the Book “The Satanic Verses”

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  • Salman Rushdie, an author, was severely stabbed in his neck and abdomen on stage by a suspect named Hadi Matar, causing him to be on a ventilator and potentially losing an eye.
  • An Iranian leader back in the 20th century wanted Rushdie killed because of his novel, Satanic Verses, that many Muslims found disrespectful. This led Salman to go into hiding for almost a decade.
  • Translators from different countries reading this book were harshly stabbed to death when the book came out and Iranian leader, Ayatollah Khomeini called for Salman’s execution for three million dollars.
  • The Iranian government has not yet responded to this issue, but many Iranians in the media claim him to be an apostate who later became an atheist.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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China Threatens Consequences if Pelosi Visits Taiwan

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  • US House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi has landed inTaiwan. Prior to the visit, China’s Foreign Ministry has voiced their disapproval, stating that “China will take resolute responses and strong countermeasures to defend its sovereignty and territorial integrity.”
  • US Secretary of State Antony Blinken emphasized in response  that “The speaker will make her own decisions about whether or not to visit Taiwan,” and that the US is looking to Beijing to “act responsibly and not to engage in any escalation going forward.”
  • The US has made it clear that members of Congress routinely visit Taiwan and that this trip is non-threatening and has precedent. Even so, some officials have expressed concern that China may invade Taiwan’s air defense zone or send missiles near Taiwan in retaliation.
  • Pelosi has criticized China’s leadership and vocalized support for Taiwan in the past. She is currently on her tour of Asia, with scheduled visits to Singapore, Malaysia, South Korea and Japan.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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First Grain Ship Departs Ukraine After Six Months of Russian Blockade

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  • The first shipment of grain departed the port of Odesa on Monday after Russia’s blockade of Ukrainian ports for the last six months trapped around 20 million metric tons of wheat and corn.
  • Russia recently made a deal with Ukraine, brokered by the UN and Turkey, allowing grain exports to resume, appeasing fears of a global food supply crisis and rising prices.
  • Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba celebrated the shipment, calling it a “day of relief for the world, especially for our friends in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa.”
  • Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky was more hesitant to celebrate the shipment, stating “it is too early to draw any conclusions and make any forecasts” and he wants to “see how the agreement works and whether security will be really guaranteed.”

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Concerns Rise As US Teeters on the Brink of Recession

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  • The US economy declines for the second quarter in a row, causing, what other countries would consider, an economic recession. 
  • The prices for groceries, gas, and other basics are rising at the fastest pace since 1981. The US Central Bank is quickly trying to raise borrowing costs in order to cool the economy and ease the prices on goods, but with the contraction, at the annual rate of 0.9% in the 3 months to July, many are still getting concerned. 
  • President Biden struggles to convince the public that the economy is sound, with the unemployment rate at a low 3.6%. But with inflation in the US hitting 9.1% in June, the fastest price appreciation in 4 months, consumer spending has slowed at an annual rate of 1%. 
  • Many other countries, such as China and the UK, have been hit harder by the surge in energy prices and the War in Ukraine, causing risks from abroad. Other countries are facing much more serious problems and once they’re hit, their problems can spill over and affect the US. 

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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North Korea Could Possibly Be Preparing another Nuclear Test

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  • North Korea could be preparing a seventh nuclear test, especially after Mr. Kim announced that the country is fully ready for any military confrontation with the US at a Korean War Anniversary event. 
  • A US special representative in North Korea states that Jong-Un has tested an unprecedented number of missiles this year—31 to 25. Jong-Un also stated that threats from the US required North Korea to achieve the urgent historical task of strengthening its self-defense. 
  • Jong-un also stated that South Korea is reviving a plan to counter North Korea’s threat by mounting precautionary strikes; in June alone, South Korea launched 8 missiles of its own.
  • The North Korean regime is especially angry with South Korea’s new president Yoon Suk-yeol and his so-called Kill Chain strategy. This strategy allows South Korea to launch ballistic missiles and air strikes on North Korean targets if it ever feels threatened. 
  • North Korea has also not been getting as much engagement with Washington ever since Biden replaced Trump, and could be hinting at some sort of deliberate escalation by the North, and preparations have been underway at the Punggye Ri test site since March.

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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Daily Brief

Russia Limits Gas Supply to Germany

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  • Gazprom, a major Russian energy provider, has stated it will reduce the supply of gas to Germany by half via the Nord Stream 1 pipeline due to repair work. 
  • Germany has said that they see no technical reason for the decrease in gas supply. The European Union continues to accuse Russia of weaponizing energy, with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky stating, “This is an open gas war that Russia is waging against a united Europe.”
  • Ukraine and Russia signed an agreement to allow the export of grain via the Black Sea after Russia continued to block millions of tonnes from being exported. The next day, Russia struck missiles at the port, some of which hit the infrastructure of the port.
  • The US and Ukraine are optimistic that the agreement will still be implemented, with the US State Department stating, “Despite these attacks, we do understand that the parties are continuing preparations to open Ukraine’s Black Sea ports for food and fertilizer exports…we also continue to expect that the Black Sea agreement will be implemented.”

All views expressed in this editorial are solely that of the author, and are not expressed on behalf of The Analyst, its affiliates, or staff.

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